Carnegie Mellon Leads the Way with Allergen-Friendly Eating

From making new friends to exploring new activities and figuring out what you’re really passionate about, college is one of the most exciting times of your life — especially at Carnegie Mellon! While navigating and exploring your new home away from home, the last thing students should have to worry about is issues related to food allergies. As universities around the country become increasingly sensitive to students’ dietary concerns, Carnegie Mellon Dining Services is taking the lead on this weighty and prevailing topic with Nourish, an allergen-friendly kitchen that opened this fall.

Allergen-Friendly Food Full of Taste

Nourish features a menu that is prepared entirely without gluten and the eight ingredients most likely to cause allergic reactions: eggs, wheat, dairy, soy, tree nuts (except coconut), peanuts, shellfish, and fish. Nourish is operated by CulinArt Group and led by Executive Chef Victor Schmidt, who has been serving allergen students at Carnegie Mellon for eight years.

“Chef Vic has poured his passion for food and his allergen expertise into the Nourish menu,” says Director of Dining Services Pascal Petter. “It’s a diverse and delicious menu that our entire campus community can enjoy.”

Prepared and sealed in a dedicated kitchen to ensure safety commitments to guests with dietary restrictions, the menu features a wide variety of made-to-order and grab-and-go foods, including sandwiches, salads, bowls, pizza, burgers, and hot entrees. There are also a number of unique vegan and plant-based offerings that can be customized to nourish sampleplease any palate.

Students, faculty, and staff can place their orders for pick up at Nourish, located on the second floor of the Cohon Center, using GET Food via the app or online from 10:30 am to 6:30 pm, Monday through Friday. Additionally, grab-and-go menu items are available at a number of on-campus locations: Carnegie Mellon Café, Entropy+, Rothberg’s Roasters II, Heinz Café, and Maggie Murph Café.

Campus Dining Meeting the Needs of Students

Food allergies aside, students tend to have stricter dietary preferences than the general population. According to Technomic’s 2017 College & University Consumer Trend Report, they’re more likely to follow special eating plans, including vegan, vegetarian, or semi-vegetarian (e.g., pescatarian) diets. The report also notes that 49 percent want to avoid meat and animal products in their meals.

“While accommodating dietary preferences has long been one of our dining program’s primary objectives, providing delicious, nutritious, allergen-friendly meal options to students unable to tolerate certain foods or ingredients is just as important to our program and the university,” says Petter.

Allergic reactions can present serious health risks and can even be life-threatening. A study at the University of Michigan found that while 47.7 percent of students with food allergies reported that they maintain a prescription for emergency medication including self-injectable epinephrine, only 6.6 percent of these individuals reported always carrying this device.

Foods can cause adverse reactions other than allergies, too. For example, people experience intolerances or sensitivities to food that cause a range of digestive issues, which can result in secondary conditions such as migraines, chronic fatigue, inflammation, skin problems, nutrient malabsorption, and severe nutrient deficiencies. Many of these individuals do not produce the enzymes necessary to break down certain types of protein, fat, and carbohydrates, including dietary fiber or sugars. Students with these reactions may need to eliminate many of the same types of food that the Nourish menu is designed to address.

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Students enjoying their first taste of Nourish during a tasting event.

“Even minor health issues can take away from a student’s college experience and journey,” says Jessica Tones, Carnegie Mellon Dining Services’ nutrition educator and dietitian who joined the team last fall. “Carnegie Mellon is committed to reducing this source stress for our students by offering safe, delicious, and convenient food options. That’s why opening Nourish for this academic year was a number one priority for me and for our dining program.”

Serving Safe Foods on Campus

For students with severe food allergies, even the tiniest exposure can produce an adverse reaction. That’s why designated food preparation areas and equipment are required to ensure their safety and health; for instance, cutting boards used to slice bread should chopping vegnever be used to chop vegetables, and separate refrigerators and food storage areas are needed to avoid unintentional cross-contact.

Equally essential is staff training: even common allergens have many aliases — like semolina for wheat and casein for dairy — so food service employees need to be aware of alternative names. Training should also emphasize accurate labeling and communication with students who have allergies.

Carnegie Mellon is excited to offer allergen-friendly dining with Nourish. These safe, delicious meals will make eating on campus easier for students with dietary restrictions, who often feel like an invisible group. Going to college is a once-in-a-lifetime experience that should be enjoyed to the fullest — without worrying about food allergies!

Carnegie Mellon Dining Services wants to hear what you think of Nourish. Share your feedback here!

An Inside Look at Being a CA

So, you’re thinking about being a CA?

You might think that to be a CA you have to be some kind of superstar RA. I don’t think so. In fact, I consider almost all of my current RAs to be better than the RA I was.

This gets at the core of what it means, to me, to be a CA: strive to make others better than you could be yourself. It’s a selfless role in many aspects, but there’s a lot in it for you as well.

Be a Mentor and an Open Book

There are two things that I would like to point out as important when thinking about how you would be as a CA:

First, bring your best self to the table, so that you can be someone the RAs can learn from and look up to. As a CA, I try to embody the kind of leader for the RAs that the RAs should strive to be with their floor. This is a high level of responsibility and leadership because your influence trickles to the whole of the building.

Secondly, and quite importantly, a good CA comes into the role willing and able to recognize and learn about their own flaws. In this regard, you must remember that it is not all on your shoulders. You have your housefellow, other housefellows and CAs, and your staff to support you.

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The 2015-16 first-year and upperclass CAs pose after painting The Fence together to welcome RAs back to campus. (Funny side note: The Fence was painted over before the RAs returned!)

Two Rules of Thumb

When I began my role as a CA, I kept in mind times when I was an RA and took on extra work myself to help others get their jobs done. After gaining advice about this from my housefellow, I decided to make it one of my main focuses starting out in my new role, and I learned two major things are critical as a CA:

  1. Delegate, delegate, delegate. Everything you don’t have to do yourself, get an RA or someone else to do it. You can’t possibly take on all the responsibilities given to you as a CA and that’s a big reason why you have a staff with responsibilities that go beyond caring for their own residents.
  1. Extend trust. When I was tempted to take over the duty of an RA (running a dorm event, for example), I stopped and reminded myself to trust them a little more. As a CA, I must teach them to fish for resident engagement, not take the rod from them.

It’s part of my job to delegate and trust. Even if the RAs fail, they will learn something. If I do it for them, they lose the potential of learning something and/or being successful, and I lose the gesture of showing my trust in their abilities. This learning experience alone has made my role as a CA worth it already. I have learned so much about being a leader and leading a team, skills that will carry through to multitudes of future roles.

Truth Be Told

Alright, honesty time. After being an RA, I didn’t really want to be a CA. I took a year off from student life. When I was thinking about jumping back in, the CA role was really the only one that made sense. But I was hesitant. I thought I would miss the residents too much and it would be all administrative stuff.

But now, I am so enjoying the position and it has felt so right. Most of my time is still spent with people, just more intentional and with deeper connections. What I failed to realize before is that by investing in a staff versus working directly with residents, RAs are so much more reciprocating – they want to work with you. Residents do too a good portion of the time, but with RAs it’s almost guaranteed that they’re in this to learn and grow with you, and that’s really exciting.

Even the administrative parts – I now can navigate Giant Eagle so well and am a pro at Google Drive. But jokes aside, even the administrative parts become meaningful because if you do it right, everything becomes attached to wide resident impact. That full cart of groceries leads to seven-floor events that brought delight to 50 different residents coming back from a long day of schoolwork. Those well-written meeting notes and staff emails lead to your RAs growing as leaders and making meaningful conversations with residents.

The Ripple Effect

And it doesn’t really matter that this is secondhand impact. That was my greatest fear – that I would lose that visible joy on our residents’ faces. Now it is replaced with joy on your RAs’ faces in your one-on-ones when your RA glowingly tells you about that amazing floor event or really deep conversation. You still get to bask and participate in that joy as a CA, perhaps on an even bigger scale. That has made it so worth it, and so much more fun than I ever thought it would be.

Take the Good with the Bad

One last thing – it may seem that being a CA is fun as long as everything goes well. I want to say that the bad things also have a captivating place. Something I’ve taken away, even after a semester of being a CA, is that it’s very hard to faze me. An RA can come in and talk about a terrible resident situation and now I have learned (not as knowledge, but perhaps more like the behavioral psych sense of stimulus and response) how to face any alarming new situation with a calm and reasoned approach.

Previously as an RA, I had two pretty well-behaved floors. Called EMS once in two years. Not a ton of “issues.” I thought I may not be ready for the CA role – I wasn’t really “experienced.”

If that’s you, well, don’t worry. You’ll learn either during CA training or even the first few situations how to be calm and respond to situations. You’ll learn to trust yourself and smartly rely on others to assist you.

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The Mudge 2015-16 staff at camp for fall RA training.

Take the Chance at Something Great!

So that’s all I got for now. In short, I am so thankful for this opportunity. Someone told me there’s really no other campus leadership position like being a CA, and I agree. If you’re on the fence, just apply! Too many great people miss out on these kinds of things because they convince themselves out of it, when the humble people are the best leaders. The worst that can happen is you learn something – go for it!

Your friendly neighborhood Mudge CA,
Erik

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This blog was written by Erik Pintar, a Carnegie Mellon University fifth year senior majoring in electrical and computer engineering and human-computer interaction. 

Interested in more stories and advice from Erik? Reach him at epintar@andrew.cmu.edu!

VISIT THE STUDENT LIFE WEBSITE FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THE CA APPLICATION PROCESS, INCLUDING MATERIALS NEEDED AND DEADLINES.

Getting to Know Jennifer Duncan

Jennifer Duncan (pictured above, far right) is the Coordinator for Greek Life and a Housefellow for Alpha Chi Omega, Delta Delta Delta, Kappa Kappa Gamma, Sigma Phi Epsilon, and Sigma Tau Gamma. She also serves as the advisor for the Panhellenic Council, Greek Sing, Order of Omega, and Rho Lambda.

Jennifer earned her undergraduate degree in history at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock and her master’s in higher education also from the University of Arkansas.

Let’s learn a little more about Jennifer!

How did you come to join Carnegie Mellon?

After working for two years in my previous role, I knew it was time to look for something new. I was really excited when this position at Carnegie Mellon opened up. I’d always heard the best things about the university and knew I had to apply. I interviewed, got the job, and moved here a few weeks later.

Being a member of a Greek community can mean many things: being a mentor, taking on leadership roles, organizing community service opportunities, creating lifelong friendships, and carrying legacies and traditions forward. What inspires you most about Greek Life at CMU?

I love all the ways Greek students are involved on campus and the cool things they do for internships or in their academic fields. This is what makes the Greek Life community at CMU so unique. Events like Greek Sing would not be what it is without the incredible talents and skills of our students.

Share an example of when a Greek Life event or initiative made a tangible and positive impact on campus or the broader community.

One of my personal interests is women’s equity and I’m passionate about education. I was so happy when I learned that the Panhellenic Council supports the Circle of Sisterhood Foundation – a foundation that seeks to uplift women out of poverty through education. This is the first year that CMU Panhellenic has donated to the foundation. I love that our students realize this is a such a necessity and are doing something about it.

What is an important life lesson you have learned from working with students, Greeks in particular?

You never know what someone else is going through. Everyone is dealing with their own challenges. It’s important for us to remember this and be supportive in the way they need.

Outside of work, what are your hobbies/interests? What are you passionate about?

I’m always up for checking out local restaurants and exploring Pittsburgh. I’m still new to the city so I’m always learning something new. I love to travel, watch SEC football (Go Hogs!), listen to podcasts, and watch Netflix.

All-time favorite book.

Yes Please by Amy Poehler

You could travel anywhere in the world for free and stay for a month. Where would you go and why?

Europe. I’ve never traveled abroad and want to so badly. Europe encompasses nine of the top 10 countries I would like to visit. I could cover a lot of ground in a month!

What advice would you give to someone living in Greek Housing?

Live it up! I never had the opportunity to live in Greek housing and I’m still upset by that. It may seem like living off-campus is the best option, but you’ll have a lot of opportunity to live off-campus after graduation. This is kind of a one-time thing so take advantage of it now!

Want to learn more about Greek Life at Carnegie Mellon? Check out the Greek Life website and the Greek Life housing website.

“RA-ing Is as Much about Giving as It Is Growing”

A sophomore majoring in mechanical engineering and physics with a penchant for performing arts, DaVonne Henry (pictured above left of center) is also an RA for Scobell 2. We asked him to share his thoughts and perspectives on his RA experience, and DaVonne provides us with a great insider look on what the RA journey means to him. His honest and personal reflections on the experience may inspire you to pursue this important and rewarding role in residence life at Carnegie Mellon University.

Why did you want to become an RA?

I’ve always enjoyed connecting with people and helping them get acquainted with new situations. I enjoy listening to people, sharing my experiences, and, on occasion, giving advice.

What do you both love and find most challenging about being an RA?

It is so easy to spend a lot of time RA-ing, so much so that you forget to think about yourself sometimes. I love that there is so much that can be done to make a community better. I enjoy every part of that. The challenge comes with balancing it with school. It’s a fun challenge to find ways to combine RA time and school/personal time. When those things come together, it’s amazing.

When you decided to apply for the role, what were you most nervous about and how did you conquer that fear/anxiety?

I was nervous about being disliked. I didn’t want a floor that wouldn’t want to talk to me or that I couldn’t connect to. Getting over that fear was equal parts action and luck. I stayed true to myself. Always. I reached out to everyone, and I figured that if someone didn’t like me, they’d simply turn down my invitation to dinner. In the end, though, I got a great group of guys on Scobell 2.

Complete this sentence: “For me, being an RA means … .”

… knowing what to say, even if you don’t. No one has a magical formula on how to make connections, deal with an emergency, or be a mentor, but for me, I want to at least be able to point someone to a resource, a club, or even just a new way of thinking.

What skills are you gaining from your role as an RA that will help you reach your future goals?

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DaVonne in his freshman residence hall, Henderson House, with a group of friends, fellow residents, and RAs.

Organization and communication. I know they’re buzz words, but RAs do a lot of planning. We coordinate events for our floors, our communities, and with other members of our staff. I’ve gotten much more comfortable coming up with an idea, hatching a plan, and getting it ready. We need to communicate effectively with our staff members, residents, and anyone else that we think can improve life in our communities. We are challenged to keep in touch and be present.

Why is the Hamerschlag/Scobell (HamSco) community awesome?

HamSco is great because of its diversity and openness. So many people are involved in so many different clubs, areas of study, and areas of interest. I have learned about rock-climbing, ultimate Frisbee, and have improved my SMASH skills enormously, all from just talking to members of the community.

Share one of your best memories/stories from your experience as an RA.

Every year, HamSco puts on a huge haunted house. I’m not big on Halloween, but I happened to be on duty that night. A few other RAs and I were led through a Dante’s Inferno themed haunted house. What I loved was not just the execution but the fact that so many people came together to put on a spectacular event. It was an interesting, albeit frightening night.

What is an important life lesson you have learned while being an RA?

You can never truly know someone fully. It’s easy to meet someone one day, or know them for a week, a month, even a semester, and feel that you can tell exactly what they’d be interested in or who they will or will not talk to, but people will always surprise you. Keep an open mind and be patient. You could end up in a great conversation with someone who would barely say “hello” to you for months.

What other organizations or interests do you take part in on campus?

I love performance arts. I am a member of the CMU Treblemakers A Cappella group, and I love to see everything that Scotch’n’Soda does, as well as make it out to choir concerts, School of Drama performances, and School of Music performances.

Piece of advice you’d give a student who is considering becoming an RA.

Think of a quality that you have that you can use to share with a community. It could be that you love sports, are extremely opinionated about current events, or are devoutly religious. That is what you will bring in to the community. That’s what will drive you in the initial stages of the work. Think of something that you would like to improve upon about yourself. It could be organization, a focus on personal well being, academics. That is what you will work on in full view of the students you are mentoring. Being an RA is as much about giving as it is about your own personal growth. No one has it all together, and what better way to approach a situation in college than by making sure you are continuously learning yourself.

Tell us something about yourself that your residents might not know.

I’m pretty sure my mom lives a more interesting life than I do. She’s more of a “I’m going out to see a jazz show in New York” person, while I’m more “I’ll stay in and watch Modern Family.”

I’m an RA. Here’s Why.

Erin Sipple is a sophomore at Carnegie Mellon University majoring in neurobiology and Hispanic studies. She’s also an RA in Fairfax Apartments. Here, she explains what being an RA means to her, discusses things she was nervous about before applying to become an RA, and shares the many ways that being an RA is personally rewarding to her.

Why did you want to become an RA?

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Last year, Erin traveled to Nicaragua with Global Medical Brigades to work with patients in a triage clinic. Care for others is clearly a personal value for Erin and one that serves her well in her role as an RA.

I believed that as an RA, I would be in a position to foster significant and positive personal development in students, which would consequently cultivate a meaningful impact on the campus community as a whole. Moreover, I felt that my personal values and strengths aligned very well with the roles and responsibilities of an RA. Although I knew being an RA would require a substantial commitment, I also knew it would be incredibly rewarding.

What do you both love and find most challenging about being an RA?

I love that being an RA isn’t something that I can clock in or out of. I am an RA 24/7, which means I am there for my residents and the community at all times. This commitment has allowed me to have a meaningful impact on the well-being of my residents. However, because I am so committed to my role, I find it challenging to feel comfortable taking time for myself when I know I could be working to help my residents in some way.

When you decided to apply for the role, what were you most nervous about and how did you conquer that fear/anxiety?

I was very nervous that my residents would be out of control, wouldn’t like me, or would need constant disciplinary action, all of which could easily inhibit my ability to form meaningful connections with my residents. In order to prevent all of these things, I was determined to establish a community built on respect among residents and between my residents and myself. This respect was fostered by being genuine and open with my residents about my expectations for the community and about myself. This way, residents could feel comfortable connecting with me on a personal level and feel comfortable as a member of our housing community.

Complete this sentence: “For me, being an RA means … .” 

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Erin and her roommate Kara enjoyed the activities at Janufest 2015. Having fun is a big part of being an RA, mentor, and friend.

Being the ultimate resource for my residents. If I cannot directly resolve an issue, I am able to connect them to the appropriate resource that can. I am whatever they need me to be: toilet paper supplier, shoulder to cry on, brownie baker, cheerleader, friend, pseudo mother, and (most importantly) someone who they can talk to and receive support from.

What skills are you gaining from your role as an RA that will help you reach your future goals?

I am gaining and developing a multitude of skills, but some of the most impacted are my time management, leadership, and communication skills.

Why is the Fairfax community awesome?

The Fairfax community is awesome because we have apartment-style living that provides a sense of privacy and independence that other housing communities don’t have. At the same time, because we are a campus housing community, we are able to promote positive personal growth among our residents as well. Residents at Fairfax get the best of both worlds.

Share one of your best memories/stories from your experience as an RA.

One of favorite experiences as an RA was when a resident of mine felt comfortable reaching out to me to talk about some personal issues regarding his/her mental health. I immediately was very open with my residents about my own struggles with depression, hoping that my openness would encourage them to come to me if they ever experienced something similar. I invited the resident to talk over tea and he/she felt more comfortable sharing his/her issues with me than with his/her friends. Because of my own experiences with psychiatrists/therapy and CaPS, this resident trusted my advice to seek counseling with CaPS and has been pleasantly surprised by how helpful is has been for him/her.

After our initial talk, this resident continued to update me on his/her progress and even knocked on my door one day saying: “Hey, I was just heading to my room but I saw you were in, and I just wanted to tell you you’re the best and thank you so much for everything.” Then, he/she gave me a hug. Moments like these, where I can see that I’ve actually made a difference in a resident’s well-being, no matter how small, are incredibly heartwarming; these moments are why I am an RA.

What is an important life lesson you have learned while being an RA? 

I’ve learned that although everyone is extraordinarily unique, there are always common threads that can connect us, and the only obstacle to connecting with someone is taking the time to find that thread.

What other organizations or interests do you take part in on campus?

I’m president of Mellon College of Science Dean’s Student Advisory Council (MCSSAC), I’m an EXCEL leader for Academic Development, and I conduct research in Dr. Gittis’s neuroscience lab.

Piece of advice you’d give a student who is considering becoming an RA.

Before becoming an RA, I believed there was a certain RA mold I’d have to fit to excel. Now though, after seeing the varied strengths of my housing community’s staff and how well we work together, I have learned that anyone can bring something to the table and play a significant role in the community. In the process of helping both your residents and the community grow, you will find yourself growing as well. It’s extremely rewarding.

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Erin and her friend Amna at Pittsburgh’s Light Up Night 2015.

Tell us something about yourself that your residents might not know.

I believe the majority of my residents know how much I care about them and how much I enjoy being there for them, but I don’t think many of them realize how much they have helped me. Even the smallest interactions with my residents make my day, and I feel so lucky to have them as my residents.

You Can Help Stop Hunger Now. Here’s How.

Every November without exception, I think about the fact that I don’t do enough. I think about the people in our city, state, country, and world who don’t have enough to eat or don’t even have access to nutritious food or clean water, luxuries that I enjoy on a daily basis and largely take for granted. I think about these things this time of year perhaps more than any other because it’s a time to be thankful, to pay attention to the things you might normally not notice or appreciate, and to look around you for ways to help, give back, and contribute.

Stop Hunger NowOn Saturday, November 7, from 11:00 am to 1:00 pm, in the Wiegand Gym in the Cohon Center, my husband and I are joining PACE (Partners Allied in Civic Engagement) and members of the Carnegie Mellon University community to help package 100,000 meals for those who need them most.

Below is information about the Stop Hunger Now organization and its incredible partnership with the Kraft Heinz Company Foundation. Once you learn more and if you are available on November 7 for two hours, register yourself, your friends, and family to help stop hunger, one meal at a time.

STOP HUNGER NOW

Stop Hunger Now gets food and life-saving aid to the world’s most vulnerable people and works to end global hunger in our lifetime. Established in 1998, Stop Hunger Now has provided over 210 million meals in more than 71 countries through boots-on-the-ground partner organizations like orphanages and medical clinics.

Here’s some staggering statistics:

  • Over 800 million people face starvation every day.
  • More than 21,000 of these people perish from malnutrition … daily.
  • Most disturbingly, 15,000 of them are children.

“Hidden hunger,” or micronutrient deficiency, is a major public health problem that can lead to conditions like iron-deficiency anemia, impair physical and mental development, weaken the immune system, and significantly increase the risk of dying before the age of five.

A Stop Hunger Now meal is a dehydrated meal comprised of rice, soy, vegetables, and a life-saving micronutrient packet that was developed by and donated through the Kraft Heinz Micronutrient Campaign (HMC). The powders in the packet contain 23 essential vitamins and minerals that can be mixed into the meal after it is cooked. The inclusion of the micronutrients in the meal helps to combat hidden hunger.

Stop Hunger Now MealCarnegie Mellon is the first university partner to join the Kraft Heinz Stop Hunger Now Campus Tour. How cool is that? Let’s be the leaders to inspire and empower even more university students to join the movement in fighting hidden hunger.

Students, faculty, staff, alumni, family members (including children ages four and up), and friends are encouraged to register: http://tinyurl.com/CMUStopsHunger. We need over 400 volunteers to package meals on November 7! Residence halls, floors, student organizations, etc. can come as a group and work alongside one another in the gym.

Questions? Contact Director of Student Activities Liz Vaughan.

This blog is written by Director of Marketing for Student Affairs Operations Mandi Semple

Getting to Know Helen Wang

Helen Wang (pictured with her son) is a first-year Housefellow for SkyVue and MM16. In addition to her role as Housefellow, Helen is the director of Residential Education and the college liaison for CMU’s interdisciplinary programs including the Entertainment Technology Center (ETC), BXA Intercollege Degree Programs, and Science and Humanities Scholars (SHS). She’s also the advisor for the Charpie Scholars Program, a Carnegie Mellon scholarship made possible by the generous Charpie family and awarded to admitted students with an exemplary academic record and promise of leadership potential.

A proud Tartan, Helen completed her undergraduate studies in English and psychology here at Carnegie Mellon and earned her graduate degree in American studies with a focus on Asian American literature at the College of William and Mary.

How did you come to join CMU?

I was working on my dissertation in American Studies, very unhappily, in New York City. I wrote to a mentor at CMU, who told me about the housefellow role. My alma mater and a great job? I was sold! The rest is history. I packed up my stuff and moved back to Pittsburgh, and now this place is so much of what home looks like.

What is an important life lesson you have learned from a student or students?

I have learned so much from students, every day and in so many different contexts, but what cuts across them all is that I’ve learned the joys of being “scrappy.” This is how I describe Carnegie Mellon and CMU students — we are scrappy and we want to do amazing things. If we can imagine or will it, we can make it happen. That makes this place a joy to be a part of every single day.

Outside of work, what are your hobbies/interests? What are you passionate about?

I am a certified yoga instructor and I love all forms of yoga. I love to cook, bake, read, and write. I also love my dog!

All-time favorite book.

East of Eden by John Steinbeck

Tell us at least one thing that’s on your bucket list.

To spend time in a natural foods-based culinary program and to write my book.

If you could give first-year students one single piece of advice as they start their journey here at Carnegie Mellon, what would it be?

Carve out time to reflect and make meaning of the incredible opportunities in your first year. Take a 12-unit course in you — which just means giving yourself space and time to think and breathe. That’s where the meaning is made. Being a CMU student isn’t about doing a million things. It’s about doing two or three things (academics included) really well and building your character from the moments that you intentionally take to reflect on them. You have time. You have space. You just need to insist on it.

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