Studying for finals requires energy, stamina, and constant focus. You have been training your brain all semester, similar to the way an athlete trains their body for competition. Imagine if an athlete skipped meals, ate mindlessly, and refueled with candy, junk food, and caffeine in preparation for a big race. Without balanced nutrition, even the best athlete’s performance would suffer!

brain-2-graySurprisingly, our brain, which is only 2% of our total body weight, consumes 20% of the calories we eat. This means that eating quality food consistently throughout the day is essential for our mind to perform at its best.

During this busy time it may feel overwhelming to spend time thinking about meals, so here are a few tips to keep your brain out of the fog:

  1.  Eat a morning meal and get your brain into gear! Grab a breakfast sandwich with a side of fruit, a quinoa breakfast bowl, or a fruit and yogurt parfait. Enjoy a coffee with breakfast, but steer clear of the sugar-laden flavored lattes that can cause your energy levels to crash.
  2. Don’t skip meals. Aim to eat a meal every 4 to 5 hours to maintain a steady supply of energy to the brain. Pack snacks like trail mix, granola bars, or fresh fruit for those times when you can’t squeeze in a meal.
  3. Stay hydrated. Water is essential for delivering nutrients to our cells (i.e. brain cells!) and can help curb cravings for junk food. Caffeine acts as a diuretic, which means that extra hydration is in order if you are drinking coffee, tea, soda, or energy drinks during long study sessions. Carry a water bottle and use the water fountains around campus to refill regularly!

Now, let’s look at some of the brain-boosting foods that can help you maximize your study time.

think-green-header

Go green with vegetables like spinach, kale, collards, Swiss chard, and broccoli! tumblr_nabgwdrqgs1rge63io1_1280Leafy greens are packed with protective antioxidants like vitamins A (in the form of beta-carotene) and C, and nutrients that boost cellular antioxidant defense like sulforaphane, which is found in cruciferous vegetables like broccoli or kale. The good news is that you can find greens all over campus – check out a few of our favorites!

  • Grill ‘n’ Greens –  every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday at the Global Flavour station in Resnik, chefs prepare lean proteins and super food greens grilled to order. You can choose from greens like bok choy, Swiss chard, kale, broccolini, radicchio, and more.
  • Super Foods Vegetarian Salad at Rothberg’s Roasters II. This salad is packed with good-for-you food: kale, Brussel sprouts, Napa cabbage, red cabbage, radicchio, as well as chickpeas, broccoli, pickled carrots, cucumbers, flax seed, avocado, edamame, and signature lemon vinaigrette.
  • Kale salad at Tazza D’Oro – kale, roasted butternut squash, and dried cranberries, served with apple cider vinaigrette.

nuts-and-seeds

Nuts and seeds like walnuts, almonds, pumpkin seeds, or flaxseeds may be small, but they deliver big nutrition. They provide a variety of unsaturated fatty acids, which are essential to brain structure and function. A diet lacking in fat can lead to sub-par brain performance, so to ensure you are operating at full capacity, sprinkle nuts and seeds on a salad or grab a handful for a satisfying snack. There are lots delicious ways to enjoy nuts and seeds when dining on campus:

  • Harvest Turkey Salad at Au Bon Pain, featuring roast turkey, romaine and spinach, cranberries, grapes, granny smith apples, goat cheese, walnuts, and balsamic vinegar.
  • Super Foods Wrap at Rotherberg Roasters II – this wrap will keep you full and focused with wheat berries, almonds, cranberries, bell pepper, ginger, honey, orange, avocado, arugula, and tomato, on a whole wheat wrap.
  • Snack on a KIND Bar from Entropy+.

omega-3

Omega 3 fats are also known as essential fatty acids (EFAs), or fats that cannot be made by the body and must be obtained from food. Among the long list of omega 3 EFA health benefits, brain development and cognitive function are at the top! Omega 3 fats may also boost your mood, something we all need during the stress of finals week. The most potent sources of omega 3 fats are found in marine foods, such as salmon, trout, albacore tuna, mackerel, oysters, and seaweed. If you prefer plant-based sources, reach for walnuts, soy, flaxseed, chia seed, and pumpkin seeds.

These dishes will help you enjoy the recommended 2 to 3 servings of fish each week:

  • Create your own unique poke bowl at iNoodle with your choice of rice or noodles, vegetables, up to two types of raw or cooked fish or shellfish, and customized flavor with sauces and spices.
poke-bowl
Poke bowl at iNoodle
  • Blackened Salmon Sandwich at the Underground, featuring a blackened center cut salmon filet topped with melted provolone on a whole grain Kaiser roll with lettuce, tomato, and creamy dill sauce.
  • Nakama Sushi – choose from a wide selection of raw, cooked, and vegetarian options, rolled fresh daily.  Nakama sushi is located in Resnik Servery, but can be found in grab-and-go coolers around campus as well!

whole-grain-header

Grains provide a dense form of carbohydrate, the nutrient that is most efficiently used to fuel the brain. The best grain foods for our body and mind are whole, unprocessed plants that digest slowly and provide a steady supply of energy. Choose whole grains like oatmeal, barley, quinoa, whole wheat, corn, or brown rice, which will provide sustained energy as you study.

  • Start your day with steel cut oats at the Carnegie Mellon Cafe, complete with your choice of custom toppings like flaxseed, hemp seed, dried fruit, and more!
  • Supergrain bowl at Evgefstos – every Monday and Thursday create a custom Supergrain bowl at the only exclusively vegetarian dining location on campus.
  • Crunchy Quinoa Salad at the Underground – quinoa, kale, shredded carrot, red cabbage, cucumber, scallion, red pepper, edamame, and cashews, with spicy peanut dressing over spring mix. Yum!

bean-header

Just like whole grains, beans and other legumes (like lentils and peas), provide slow-digesting, complex carbohydrates. Beans also pack a full serving of protein per 1/2 cup, making them a great choice when you need your meal to keep you satisfied so that you can keep your mind on your studies. Beans offer an excellent source of B vitamins like folate and B6 that are linked to regulating metabolism and maintaining normal brain and nervous system function. When you order food on campus, ask for beans on a salad, in a burrito, or make them your main dish!

  • Chana Masala at the Taste of India – chickpeas are the star of the show in this
    tazza-d-veggie-lunch
    Chickpea salad & mushroom panini at     Tazza D’Oro

    flavorful Masala curry dish.

  • Build your perfect tacos, burrito, or bowl at El Gallo de Oro. You choose between black beans or pinto beans, combined with rice, protein, vegetables, and the salsa that fits your spice level.
  • Chickpea salad at Tazza D’Oro – this grab-and-go salad is tossed with Mediterranean spices, lemon, and olive, making it a filling and flavorful treat. Pair with a panini made with a multigrain roll and a mixed green salad for the perfect trifecta of brain food!

berry-header

Berries are truly a powerhouse fruit. Due to the high skin-to-fruit ratio, berries are low in calories, high in fiber, and provide a dense source of unique plant nutrients, called phytonutrients. Phytonutrients are concentrated in the skin of fruits and are linked to the color of the fruit. The highest concentration of a group of phytonutrients called anthocyanins are found in dark blue and red berries such as blueberries, blackberries, and cranberries as well as cherries, and red and purple grapes. Anthocyanins have been shown to improve memory, as well as protect brain cells by reducing inflammation. Take advantage of berry benefits by adding them to your yogurt, cereal, oatmeal, smoothie, salad, or simply enjoy them as a snack!

Carnegie Mellon Dining Services wants to know what foods help you to stay focused during finals. Share your tips here!

Taste of India 101

Eating Indian food is a culinary experience unlike any other: the bold and complex spices, the rich, silky texture of curry, the bright acidity of chutneys and achaars (pickled fruit or vegetable), the cooling effect of raita (yogurt sauce), and perhaps the best part, the fresh, handmade bread used to scoop and savor all of these flavors together in one perfect bite.

Indian food is as diverse as the subcontinent that it comes from. For those new to this distinctive cuisine, navigating the menu can be overwhelming. We asked Harjit Singh, chef and owner of Taste of India, to teach us the basics and help us explore his menu. Having served delicious Indian food to the Pittsburgh and Carnegie Mellon communities for 25 years, both at his location in Resnik and his restaurant on Penn Avenue in Lawrenceville, we knew he’d have a lot to share.

punjab
Location of Punjab, India

In 1982, Mr. Singh moved from the state of Punjab, located in northern India, to New York City. He lived there for nearly a decade, working in restaurants and building the foundation of his culinary skills and passion for cooking. In 1991, he moved to Pittsburgh to be closer to family and to pursue his dream of owning a restaurant. In the same year, he opened both the Penn

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Mr. Singh cooking at his Penn Avenue location

Avenue and CMU locations, specializing in North Indian cuisine. Mr. Singh describes his regional cuisine as “very rich, savory, and less spicy than many other regional cuisines.”

When we asked about the most popular item on the menu, Mr. Singh did not hesitate: “Chicken Tikka Masala.” It’s a recipe that is usually reserved for special occasions for a home cook, yet it is available at the CMU location daily. This labor-intensive dish is truly decadent: melt-in-your-mouth chicken, braised in a velvety, deep-orange curry, exploding with flavor from over a dozen herbs and spices, aromatic vegetables, tomatoes, and cream. As in any restaurant, Mr. Singh noted that there are a number of dishes that diners overlook. If you are looking for a hidden gem, consider the chef’s favorites that are noted throughout.

Achaars

achaarIf you have eaten at Taste of India on campus, it is likely that you have tried an achaar, as it is offered as a complimentary condiment with any meal. Achaar translates to the word pickle, which is a fruit or vegetable that has been preserved with an oil or an acid, such as vinegar or citrus juice. Achaars may be sour and spicy, ranging from mild to very hot.

Alu or Aloo

aloo
Alu Gobi 

Alu is the word for potato. The starches in potatoes make them perfect for absorbing and extending flavor, making them a favorite ingredient to highlight the depth of a dish. Alu is often prepared with a wet or dry curry and combined with other vegetables and proteins as a main dish, or transformed into a spicy filling for samosas, parathas, dosas, or alu tikki.

 

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Baingan Bhartha

Baingan

Baingan is the word for eggplant, commonly featured with other vegetables in curries such as alu baingan or in baingan bharta, a popular dish featuring smoky, char-grilled eggplant mashed with spices.

Basmati Rice basmati

Rice is an essential base for Indian cuisine and Basmati is always the rice of choice. It’s a high quality, long grain rice that is prized for its aromatic qualities and nutty flavor. It may be served plain or in rice dishes such as Biryani.

 

biryani
Lamb Biryani, a chef’s favorite

Biryani

This versatile rice-based dish can be prepared with any combination of meat, vegetables, and dried or fresh herbs and spices. For a sweet-savory twist, some variations include dried or fresh fruit and nuts. Biryani may be accompanied with raita, or other sauces or chutneys. If you make it to the Penn Avenue location, try one of Mr. Singh’s favorite dishes – Lamb Biryani.

 

Breads

  • Chapati or Roti – an unleavened bread prepared from atta (a finely ground whole wheat flour), water, oil, and salt. It is rolled to a tortilla-like thickness and quickly cooked over an open flame. This is considered the everyday bread in Indian homes, perfect for scooping up curry.breads
  • Paratha – an unleavened bread made from whole wheat flour. It is a thicker bread with flaky layers as a result of folding the dough repeatedly, similar to a pastry dough. Herbs or spices may be folded in to the dough. It is then pan-fried with a light oil or ghee.
  • Poori (Puri) – an unleavened deep-fried bread often prepared for festivals or special occasions.
  • Naan – a leavened bread usually prepared with white flour and cooked in a clay tandoori oven. It can be stuffed with vegetables and herbs. While this is the most popular bread in many Indian restaurants, Tandoori ovens are rare in homes; therefore, it is not a bread that is eaten regularly in everyday kitchens. Naan is the only bread available on campus, but all varieties are available at the Penn Avenue location.Check out the Taste of India Tandoori oven in action!

 

channa
Chana Masala

Chana or Channa

Chana means chickpea, a staple in Indian cooking. This creamy legume is incredibly versatile and may be served whole in dishes such as Chana Masala or mashed and mixed with spices and fried as an appetizer. Chickpea flour is used as a breading or to make savory pancakes, crepes, flatbreads, or crispy papadum snacks. Chickpea flour is also known as gram flour or besan.


Chutney 

3_way_chutneyServed as a condiment or accompaniment, chutney offers brightness and acidity, which creates a perfect balance when combined with rich, earthy, spice-laden dishes. Chutney is the name for relish and is typically made from fruits or vegetables combined with an acid (citrus juice or vinegar), ranging from sweet to sour to spicy. Green, tamarind, and mango chutneys are some of the most popular varieties.

Curry

Perhaps the style of cooking most commonly associated with Indian cuisine, curry is a general term for either a combination of dry and/or fresh herbs and spices that are ground into dry Spices 1.jpgspice mixtures or a paste to create a signature flavor. Whole dry spices such as cumin, coriander, mustard, fenugreek, clove, cinnamon, turmeric, or cardamom (to name a few) are always toasted to enhance the flavor prior to grinding. Curry paste may also include fresh aromatics curry_-_indian_cuisinesuch as garlic, onion, and ginger (Mr. Singh’s top three favorites), cilantro, or lemon grass, and combined with an oil or ghee to form a paste consistency. Dry curry or curry paste added at the beginning of the cooking process infuses the flavors into the cooking oil. Curry sauces are also known as wet curry, a gravy-like sauce created by the addition of a liquid such as yogurt, coconut milk, stock, water, milk, or cream. Each region or family is known for unique curries; however, some common names for curry on a menu are Masala (the word for spice), Madras, Kormaor Vindaloo.

Dal

Lentils, peas, or beans, also known as legumes or pulses, which are often dal.jpgsplit and sometimes hulled (skin removed). The process of splitting increases the surface area of the legume, which decreases cooking time and exposes the starchy inside, creating a creamy, sauce-like texture when cooked. Dal is the name of both the ingredient and the prepared dish. It can be seasoned in a number of ways and is commonly prepared with aromatics and spices and cooked to a porridge-like consistency and served over rice with bread.

Ghee 

Clarified butter is made by melting the butter and removing the milk solids, which helps to prevent burning when cooking at high heat, making it more suitable for frying and sautéing. Ghee, while a typical cooking oil, has become less popular as consumers request vegetable-based oils for health reasons.

Kheer
kheer


Rice pudding, served as a dessert, made with rice, milk, sugar, and cardamom. Variations may include ingredients such as rose water, nuts (like almonds or pistachios), or fruit.

kofta
Saag Kofta


Kofta

Best translated as “meatballs,” although koftas are often vegetarian and may be made from potatoes, vegetables, or paneer. Saag kofta, or “spinach ball,” is made by mixing chopped spinach, onion, garlic, spices, and chickpea flour and forming it into balls, which are then fried and served in a curry sauce.

Mattar

Mattar or matar is the word for green peas. Mattar is featured in many curries, combined with other vegetables (such as alu mattar), in mattar paneer, or added to samosa filling.

matar_panir_mit_chapati_-_mutter_paneer_with_chapati
Mattar Paneer

Paneer

A fresh, non-melting farmer’s cheese that is set by an acid, such as lemon juice or vinegar. You will find paneer in many forms on the menu: cubed and added to curries, such as palak paneer or mattar paneer, or in pakoras, fritters that are served as an appetizer or snack. As it is generally an unsalted cheese, it can easily be transformed into a number of creamy desserts.

lamb-saag
Lamb Saag –      a chef’s favorite!

Saag or Palak

 

Although the words saag and palak are often used interchangeably, they are not the same. Saag is the general word for greens, and palak means spinach. So technically, saag might be spinach or another green leafy vegetable, but palak will always be spinach. Another classic dish is palak paneer – one of the best vegetarian offerings on campus! If you go to the Penn Avenue location, you will have the opportunity to taste Mr. Singh’s favorite dish – lamb saag.  

Pilav

Pilav translates to pilaf, a rice dish with spices, aromatics, and vegetables, as in peas pilav.

rajma
Rajma

Rajma

This simple, satisfying dish features red kidney beans in a rich gravy with tomatoes, onions, and, of course, lots of spices.

tandoori-oven
Tandoori Chicken

Tandoori

A traditional style of cooking, utilizing wood or charcoal in a cylindrical clay oven, that produces smoky, grilled meats, vegetables, or breads at temperatures reaching as high at 900 degrees Fahrenheit. Favorite dishes include tandoori chicken (marinated with yogurt and spices) and naan bread.


Vindaloo

vindaloo
Vindaloo chicken, a chef’s favorite!

Vindaloo originated in Portugal and is named for its key ingredients: a marinade of wine or wine vinegar (vinho) and garlic (alhos). The dish was transformed to become a traditional Goan dish, laced with warm spices, onion, and chili peppers. Vindaloo is assumed to be a very spicy dish due to the Kashmiri chiles, which contributes a fiery red color, but they are not an especially hot chili. The heat level will vary depending on the restaurant, but it is a dish that can be customized for those seeking a dish that offers more or less spice.

 

Carnegie Mellon University Dining is incredibly fortunate to have Taste of India on our campus and as a part of the Pittsburgh dining scene. Visit the CMU location, the Penn Avenue location, or have food delivered from the restaurant through Happy Belly. Catering for campus is also available upon request by emailing tasteofindiapgh@gmail.com.

taste_of_india_resnik_cafe

We want to hear from you!  What is your favorite Indian dish?

Getting to Know Jessica Tones

Carnegie Mellon Dining Services continues to strengthen its commitment to health and wellness for the campus community, and one exciting way it’s exemplified that this academic year is through the hiring of Jessica Tones, the newest member of the Dining Services team serving as a registered dietitian, nutrition educator, and marketing coordinator. In this unique role, Jessica will collaborate with Carnegie Mellon Health Services and dining vendors to counsel students, and other community members, on dietary restrictions and allergens, and assist them in navigating our unique dining program. Additionally, Jessica will organize campus-wide health and wellness initiatives and outreach programs, and assist in marketing the dining program.

Jessica most recently worked for Giant Eagle, Inc. as a regional dietitian specialist and wellness coach. She has extensive experience in nutrition-based educational programs and classes, one-on-one counseling, and the creation of nutrition education materials. Jessica was also an adjunct instructor of nutrition at the Pittsburgh Technical College.

We are so excited to welcome Jessica to the Carnegie Mellon community. Let’s learn more about her!

Where did you go to college/graduate school and which licensed/registered degrees have you earned?

I am a registered dietitian nutritionist, which means that I completed both an undergraduate degree and a post-graduate 1200-hour dietetic internship. I graduated from San Diego State University with a bachelor’s degree in foods and nutrition and completed my dietetic internship at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Shadyside Presbyterian Hospital.

How did you get into the field of nutrition?

Simply put, I love food. I wanted to share my love of food in a way that is science-based, while also respecting where food comes from and promoting good health. My own journey with food and nutrition taught me that a healthy, balanced relationship with food means more than just “eating healthy.”  Through my education and professional experiences, I have learned that nutrition is not one-size-fits-all. Nutrition is about nourishing the body through food, and I love to help people figure out what that means for them. My goal is to help others hash out nutrition fact from fiction and to provide clear, food-based solutions that inspire people to develop healthier food habits.

How do you stay up-to-date on nutrition trends and information?

The world is saturated with nutrition information, so I try to keep up with current, evidence-based research as well as consumer interests and food trends. In addition to reading professional journals, I love Today’s Dietitian magazine and follow dietitians on social media. Grocery shopping also happens to be one of my favorite ways to keep up with what is going on with food. I spend a lot of time checking out new foods and reading labels – don’t go grocery shopping with me if you are in a hurry to get home!

My most valuable professional resources are my memberships to Dietetic Practice Groups (DPGs) through the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, which are subgroups of dietitians who work to share information and offer extensive resources and continuing education opportunities. I am currently a member of three DPGs: Food and Culinary Professionals; Sports, Cardiovascular and Wellness Nutrition; and Dietitians in Integrative and Functional Medicine.

What are some of your priorities for the coming year regarding nutrition on CMU’s campus?

My number one priority is to listen and learn. I want to know what students are looking for in regards to nutrition information and healthy offerings from Dining Services, and I will use this info as a guide for my work. In my time so far, I can see that dining is doing a lot of exciting work to provide variety and healthful options around campus, and sometimes students aren’t aware of what is available to them. I hope to expand communication between Dining Services and students through our website, social media, discussion, DSAC meetings, and signage at the point of purchase. I am also looking forward to opportunities to engage with students in-person at events throughout the year, such as Taste of the Tartans (which takes place Tuesday, 9/27, from 11 am to 2 pm in Rangos in the Cohon Center) and cooking demonstrations.

How will you be a resource for students?

I am a resource for anything related to dining. I can help students identify foods on campus that fit their health and nutrition goals, whether it be related to a food allergy, identifying vegetarian/vegan options around campus, or fueling for athletic events. If you don’t have specific questions, but want to keep up with how dining is working to offer healthful options on campus, follow us on our social sites as I will be contributing to these regularly.

If you could give one piece of nutrition advice to a busy CMU student, what would it be?

Don’t forget to eat! Food is fuel, for both your body and your mind. You can’t perform at your best when you are running on empty. Take a few moments to think about your day and when you can fit food in. This may mean that you have to pack some snacks or grab a yogurt and a piece of fruit if you have a busy day and will not have time for lunch. Our hours and locations page on the Dining Services website makes it easy to see what’s open now and you can filter to see what will be open in the future.

Personally speaking, what is your favorite meal to prepare/cook/serve?

My favorite type of food is Mexican food. After living in San Diego for eight years, I have an almost constant craving for handmade corn tortillas and Al Pastor tacos.

My favorite food to cook is anything braised – soups, stews, slow-cooked meats that shred with a fork. I love taking simple ingredients and creating something rich and complex that can only be achieved by heat and time.

pozole-verde-3-2
Pozole verde – delish!

My favorite dish to prepare and serve is pozole verde. It starts by making chicken stock, simmering overnight. The verde, or green sauce, is made from tomatillos, onions, garlic, jalapeño, cilantro, and pumpkin seeds, which help to thicken the soup. The verde sauce is blended and sautéed to develop flavor and then added to the broth, along with hominy and shredded chicken. Then you wait. I usually let it cook for at least four to eight hours, barely simmering on the stove. When it is time to eat, the best part is making it your own with all of the toppings – cilantro, diced onion, dried Mexican oregano, avocado, thinly-sliced cabbage, radish, a squeeze of lime, and a tostada to eat it with or crumble on top. This is a fun meal to share with friends; everyone can customize their pozole, kind of like phở. There are many ways to speed up the preparation process, but I love to make every part of it from scratch. I usually make it over the holidays when I have a few days off in a row and can take my time and enjoy the process.

 

family-pic-2
Jessica hiking with her husband and daughter.

Outside of food and work, what are some of your hobbies/interests?

I love to travel and learn about other cultures, read, go to stand-up comedy shows, and exercise – hiking, cardio kickboxing, and yoga being my favorites. A new hobby is making succulent and cactus gardens – my goal this year is to create a succulent wall in my living room. I was inspired on my last trip to San Diego where it is really popular to use drought-resistant plants. Also, I have a 16-month old daughter, who I jokingly like to say is my new hobby, since a leisurely day drinking coffee, reading a book, going to yoga, and going out for a nice meal is a rarity these days. She is amazing – she is sweet, snugly, and loves to make people laugh.

Tell us at least one thing that is on your bucket list.     

Hiking Mount Kilimanjaro and Machu Picchu. These combine my love of hiking, traveling, and learning about other cultures in some of the most incredible places in the world.

What questions do you have for CMU’s dietitian? Share them here!

Savor the Flavor of Eating Right!

National Nutrition Month® is a nutrition education and information campaign created annually in March by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The campaign focuses attention on the importance of making informed food choices and developing sound eating and physical activity habits.

The National Nutrition Month® theme for 2016 is “Savor the Flavor of Eating Right,” which encourages everyone to take time to enjoy food traditions and appreciate the pleasures, great flavors and social experiences food can add to our lives.

Carnegie Mellon University Dining Services is celebrating National Nutrition Month® with a series of events and by highlighting some of the healthy and delicious food options we offer across campus throughout the academic year.

Attend a National Nutrition Month® Event!

Make sure to stop by one or all of the following special events taking place on Wednesdays throughout the remainder of March.

March 23, 10:30 am – 1:00 pm
Tazza D’Oro in the Gates Hillman Complex

Tazza D'Oro Cafe revised.fw

Tazza D’Oro will be handing out free samples of its new homemade, healthy grab-and-go items (see below). While you’re noshing on yummy free samples, you can also spin the nutrition trivia wheel with our PHAs for fun prizes!

Underground Orange 900r300March 23, 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
The Underground in Morewood Gardens

More prize wheel nutrition trivia with PHAs will take place later in the day at The Underground, with free samples of the UG’s fruit and nut salad on Wednesday, March 16, and the filling of the bean and rice wrap on Wednesday, March 23.

Farmers Market
March 30, 11:00 am – 1:00 pm
Merson Courtyard outside of the Cohon Center

Celebrate spring and locally-sourced food at the first Farmers Market of the semester! Chef Vic will conduct a cooking demonstration and delicious items will be available for purchase including but not limited to fresh hand-pulled mozzarella, baguettes, focaccia and Italian bread baked fresh from Breadworks, hot house grown herbs, tomatoes, mushrooms, and Naturi yogurt.

Do Something Good for You: Eat Healthy!

We can all agree it’s not easy to eat healthy all the time … but it certainly is easier when your healthy food choices are also delicious. Below is a short list of good-for-you foods that are also tasty at dining concepts across campus:

TheExchangenobackground
While the amazing sandwiches are what The Exchange is known and loved for, super healthy and yummy salads are also offered on the menu – bulgar wheat kale salad, cucumber feta olive salad, and a create-your-own option. Choose to top your salad with the homemade avocado cilantro vinaigrette and you get an extra dose of mono and poly unsaturated fats, both heart healthy fats.

evgefstos 1200r300
Featuring exclusively vegetarian, vegan, and superfood specialties, Evgefstos offers a diverse range of cuisines from around the globe, with plant-based ingredients seasoned and prepared to take on the flavors of Asia, India, and the Mediterranean. Lunch offers steamed veggies, made-to-order flatbreads and wraps, veggie burgers, homemade hummus, fresh falafel, and more. Dinner features a build-your-own theme each night of the week, plus hot and cold sides to add to a meal. A campus favorite for more than 10 years, Evgefstos is open Monday through Friday, 11:00 am to 8:00 pm, in the Cohon Center.

Stephanies 900r300
The owners and operators of The Exchange in Tepper offer a super healthy smoothie at Stephanie’s in the Mellon Institute and at the Red Oak Café in Oakland, called OTY. It’s made with oats, tea, and yogurt with antioxidant-ripe fruits and nutrient-rich whole grains, nuts, and seeds. Pictured here is the Blue Power OTY, packed with blueberries, lemon, vanilla, and hibiscus.

GrillNgreensLogo - cropped

Every Tuesday and Thursday at the Global Flavour station in Resnik, enjoy chef-prepared fresh, lean proteins and super food greens … grilled! Grill’n’Greens offers whole foods at their best – simply prepared and bursting with flavor and nutrition.

Tazza D'Oro Cafe revised.fw
Tazza D’Oro, located in the Gates Hillman Complex, serves drinks and food with ingredients that are organic and locally-sourced whenever possible. New items on Tazza’s menu include a wild mushroom panini for lunch and the following grab-and-go items: a beans and greens sandwich, hummus and veggies, kale/roasted butternut squash/goat cheese salad, Mediterranean salad, quinoa salad, chickpea salad, and bottled chocolate milk from Brunton Dairy. And check out the long list of local growers and suppliers Tazza partners with to source its ingredients:

  • Brunton Dairy
  • Kistaco Farm
  • Greenawalt Farm
  • JL Kennedy Farm
  • Garfield Farm
  • Goat Rodeo Farm
  • Stagnos Bakery
  • Enrico’s Bakery
  • Gluten Free Goat Bakery
  • Wild Purveyors
  • Greek Gourmet
  • Stover’s Company
  • B&K Farm


Pomegranate 3000r300

The Pomegranate
, now located in Tartans Pavilion in Resnik, serves fresh-squeezed orange and grapefruit juices and is considering adding fresh-squeezed carrot juice to the menu as well.

tartan-express_logo_red.fw
“Savor the flavor of eating right” at the Tartan Express food truck from March 28 through April 1 with the vegetarian special that week – kale earth ramen!

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Research shows that eating a healthy breakfast increases energy, improves concentration, enhances academic performance, and helps maintain a healthy weight. Now, you can get a breakfast burrito at El Gallo de Oro in the Cohon Center, Monday through Friday, 7:00 am to 10:30 am. If you order the block breakfast, you also get a piece of fresh fruit. A protein, beans, veggies, and fruit … sounds like a good way to start the day!

Carnegie Mellon Dining Services is curious about how you will engage with the National Nutrition Month initiative. We invite you to share your healthy eating habits by posting on this blog.

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Food, Family & Borscht: These Are a Few of His Favorite Things

If you dine on Carnegie Mellon’s campus, you likely know Chef Vic. He is outgoing and friendly, goes out of his way to make his customers happy and satisfied, and is totally passionate about food.

A lifelong foodie, he’s been a Culinart chef for Carnegie Mellon Dining Services since 2009. In terms of his dining roles on campus, he does a bit of everything, including assisting Health Services with incoming students who have special dietary needs, pitching in with catering for busy times like graduation or orientation, overseeing Hunt Library’s food program, attending Dining Student Advisory Council (DSAC) meetings, helping with menu development for Culinart locations across campus, and taking part in union relations and staff training.

Tell us about how you got started in the food industry.

I had a very humble beginning in the food industry, starting out in a fast food chain restaurant at the age of 16. I became a dishwasher in a bar restaurant at 17 and a food prep worker in a country club at 18. By 21, I was the sous chef in a hotel conference center in Ossining, New York. One day the executive chef, who had trained and trusted me with his kitchen, walked out after an argument with the general manager. I inherited his position and from then on never stopped educating myself with food literature and through hands-on dining experiences.

After that, I became Chef de Cuisine at Millbrook Golf and Tennis Club, worked for a time with Sodexo and Aramark, and joined Culinart in 2007 as an executive chef at IONA College in New York.

What do you value most about Carnegie Mellon University?

What it represents as an institution – a multitude of ethnic backgrounds and cultures from around the globe. It’s as much a melting pot as my home, New York.

How do you develop your menu(s)?

I have a tremendously creative team. They bring a lot of ideas to the table, from dated classics to the latest trends. We talk the ideas through and come up with a plan. Then we communicate with our guests and the well-received items find their way back onto the menus in the future.

Why are you passionate about food?

I grew up with half of my backyard as a vegetable garden. When my father wasn’t picking my soccer ball out of it, he was picking tomatoes and cucumbers for his homemade pickles and sauce. Memorable experiences centered on food were a big part of my upbringing. One of my fondest childhood memories is “donut day” – the day my father would make a huge batch of sweet buttermilk donut dough. My sisters and I would create any shape that came to mind before dad would drop them in the deep fat fryer. We made dinosaurs, smiley faces, braided art … it was always good times.

So really, at the end of the day, I am passionate about family, and food is a big part of bringing family together.

Personally speaking, what’s your preference – cook in or dine out?

I love to cook in, but of the two I prefer to dine out. I am always looking for a new flavor profile that I haven’t experienced yet.

What is your favorite meal to prepare/cook/serve?

I enjoy Thanksgiving dinner. It is a family effort that can go in many different directions, but in the end it brings people you love together under one roof.

All-time favorite food or meal.

One if by Land, Two if by Sea in Manhattan has the best Moscow Borscht. It’s a hearty soup made primarily with cabbage and beets and was served with skirt steak and covered with a flaky pastry. It was amazing! I have duplicated it on several occasions and have even served it here at CMU on one of our Chef’s Table menus.

Outside of food and work, what are some of your hobbies/interests?

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Chef Vic’s precious grandchildren! Isaiah Armani, Gage Lee, Skyler Amy Lynn, Niko Lee, Iris Jade, and baby Scarlett Marie.

I like RPG video games, intelligent conversation, playing chess, On Demand cable show binging, dominoes, and, most of all, spending time with my beautiful wife, children, and grandchildren (pictured).

(And, for those who don’t know, RPG video games are digital versions of games like Dungeons and Dragons.)

Tell us at least one thing that is on your bucket list.

To beat Bobbie Flay in an iron chef competition.

Check out some of Chef Vic’s latest cuisine adventures at Global Flavour and Tartans Pavilion, both located in Resnik.

cmu-global flavour-horizontalGlobal Flavour features international cuisines, exploring a new country each week beginning on Sunday. Cuisine themes include Korean BBQ, northern Italian, Japanese, French, and much more. Global Flavour is open seven days a week from 5:00 to 9:00 pm.

TartansPizzaItsPersonalLogoSmallNew at Tartans Pizza in Tartans Pavilion are chef’s ciabatta melts, featuring four delicious options available all day and night long: the Meatless Monday Melt, the Buffalo Chicken Bacon Ranch, the Meatball and Sausage Parmesan, and the Jalapeno Pineapple BBQ Pork. Tartans Pizza is open Monday through Friday, 11:00 am to 11:00 pm, and on Saturday and Sunday from 5:00 pm to 11:00 pm.

Tried and True: Carnegie Mellon’s Very Own Pittsburgh Restauranteur

Mark Hastie is the owner and operator of three dining locations on Carnegie Mellon University’s campus – The Underground in Morewood Gardens, The Zebra Lounge in the College of Fine Arts, and SEIber Café in the Software Engineering Institute.

Additionally, Mark and Matt owned and operated one of the longest-running and award-winning restaurants in Pittsburgh from 1989 to 2013 – Gullify’s Restaurant in Squirrel Hill. Gullifty’s won the “Best Desserts in Pittsburgh” award for 30 years in a row, as well as “Best Late Night” place to eat, “Best Neighborhood Restaurant,” and “Best Sandwich Menu.”

Mark has been a part of the university community for 15 years. Let’s learn more about him!

Tell us about how you got started in the food industry.

In high school, I had a job busing tables at the William Penn Hotel and also at the Carlton Restaurant. In college, I worked at a pizza shop that was part of a restaurant group. I worked my way up through all the group locations and eventually bought out the owner of Gullifty’s with my brother.

What do you like most about Carnegie Mellon University?

I love that CMU is dedicated to the student experience in all ways – from empowering them to be involved in the life of the school, to making sure they have a safe and comfortable environment, to offering them a great dining experience.

How do you develop your menu(s)?

I’ll try something new and think, “wow, that’s something!” I’ll be traveling and see or smell something that I have to try.  I’ll see a new trend or ingredient and experiment with it.

What’s something special you’ve done at one of your locations that has really been a hit?

From time to time we get requests from the residents in Morewood for a theme night. One year we had a Pan-Asian night. The residents helped plan the menu, prepared and served the food, and worked the registers for the event. That was a big hit.

Why are you passionate about food?

Everything is enhanced by food. A good meal in any situation makes everyone feel better. If you think about it, almost any celebration or gathering you’ve ever been a part of centers around food.

Personally speaking, what’s your preference – cook in or dine out?

Cook in.

What is your favorite kind of meal?

The one someone else makes for me, since I’ve been in the restaurant business nearly my entire life. I also love the black box challenge – open the refrigerator door and create something from what’s on hand.

All-time favorite food:

Any kind of seafood.

Where have you traveled recently? Do you have any more trips planned?

We spent last year exploring America: Louisville, Nashville, Memphis, Phoenix, Key West, and Lake Erie. Next up is the Bahamas in June!

Mark cave diving in Florida.
Cave diving in Florida

Outside of food and work, what are some of your hobbies/interests?

I love to play tennis and golf and also enjoy sailing, wine making, traveling, and scuba diving.

What kinds of wine do you make? 

All hearty reds from California grapes. Sangiovese, Zinfandel, Allicante, Cabernet, Merlot, Petit Syrah, and Pinot Noir. I make it with two other guys and we all take it with us wherever we go so everyone gets a bottle or two for Christmas, birthdays, or casual dinners. Occasionally, I’ll do a small batch of a white or fruit wine.

Living & Learning at CMU: Catherine’s Experience

Marketing assistant for Carnegie Mellon Student Affairs Operations, Catherine Kildunne is a sophomore linguistics major. She’s involved in Greek life as a member of Tri Delta, is part of Scotch’n’Soda Theatre, and writes for The Cut, Carnegie Mellon’s music magazine. Above, she is pictured (second from the left) with members of CMU’s Summer Pre-College staff during the summer of 2014.

You lived in Stever House as a freshman. What did you love about your Stever experience?

When I joined Stever freshman year, I lived on the third floor as part of themed housing for the Science and Humanities Scholars (SHS) program. We also lived with people from the Humanities Scholars Program (HSP) and BXA Intercollege Degree Program. I loved how tight-knit we all became being a part of these academic programs together, and I also enjoyed the healthy dose of 3ver (Stever + floor 3 = 3ver) pride.

Stever is so conducive to everyone hanging around in the common areas. In fact, some of the most fun came from getting to know people I would never have spent that much time with otherwise.

(Also … air conditioning. I’m a bit of a wimp when it comes to weather, so air conditioning was key!)

What makes living in CMU Greek housing so awesome?

Fall 2014 sophomoresLiving in my Tri Delta sorority house this year is something I wouldn’t trade for anything. My experience in Greek life has been overwhelmingly positive, so I jumped on the opportunity to live in the house. The most important part for me is definitely the people who have made it so fun. If you ever have the opportunity to live in a house with 28 of your friends, take it!

Also, I can’t forget to mention the fact that the commute to campus consists of walking across the street. I actually didn’t think it would be possible to get closer to campus than my freshman dorm! I was happily wrong about that. The location of my Greek house is something I am endlessly thankful for when it’s freezing or raining (which is, unfortunately, the majority of the academic year).

Favorite place to eat on campus?

It’s definitely The Underground. I don’t think I’ve ever bought anything from there that wasn’t grilled cheese and French fries. There’s many more options there, of course, but … if I could only eat one meal for the rest of my life, it would definitely be grilled cheese.

Share one of your most prized CMU memories.

Probably Carnival 2015. It’s the only time when everyone puts being busy on hold for a second just to relax and hang out with friends, which is something I think is vastly under-prioritized in general.

What’s an important life lesson you have learned in your time here?

I realized the best way to express gratitude for all the opportunities I’ve had is to make the most of my experiences. You have to decide for yourself what you’re trying to get out of university, because it’s practice for real life and you should definitely be deciding for yourself what you’re trying to get out of life.

What’s your all-time favorite book?

This is a hard one, as I love to read … probably something by Ernest Hemingway or Kurt Vonnegut.

What’s something you want to do before you graduate from Carnegie Mellon?

I want to watch the sunrise from the top of a building. I’ve never seen a sunrise before and I think it would be beautiful.